• flowers,  Macro

    Dahlia, my love

    Dahlia, my love. Flowers that make us forget the burden of a moment. Photographed each of them alone and as a pair. I tested HighKey shots instead of HDR, in the background different white tones.

    The result did not leave me alone. Afterwards I wanted to try my hand at photographing a hen’s egg to study shades of different white (basically grey and yellow) tones. Unfortunately this did not happen today due to an emergency examination.

    Red Dahlia II (single shot) © Julian Köpke
    Two Dahlias in a white vase © Julian Köpke

    More flowers to be seen in my Flickr-Album Flowers.

  • General,  Macro,  Monochrome,  reflection

    Reflection II

    Most of what we do see with our eyes is a reflection. Any light from a bouquet of flowers is just reflection. Looking through a bottle shows beside reflection some refraction.  The only exception, where we don’t see reflected light is e.g. offered by an open fire or a light bulb. The sight of a star also shows direct light, which is usually subject to refraction due to the atmosphere.

    Our eyes seem to absorb the light when we see. In fact, they can also reflect the incident light. We know this phenomenon from cat images that we have mistakenly photographed with a flash light. 

    Sitting in front of me my right eye is on the viewers left side and the left eye is on its right side. The instrument uses a red and a green laser at a harmless energy dose.

    Fundus of right eye seen in red and green laser light © Julian Köpke
    Fundus of left eye seen in red and green laser light © Julian Köpke

    With different wave lengths of a laser an ophthalmologist is able to see different structures of the fundus and uses this property for diagnostic purposes. Looking at the green color only that stems from the green laser, the result is a monochrome image that shows vessels of the surface of the retina and smalls nerves joining the papilla.

    Fundus of right eye seen in green laser light © Julian Köpke
    Fundus of left eye seen in green laser light © Julian Köpke

    Looking at the red channel displaying the reflections of the red laser light, monochrome images show deep vessels behind the retina.

    Fundus of right eye seen in red laser light © Julian Köpke
    Fundus of left eye seen in red laser light © Julian Köpke

    Beside the medical point of view there is an aesthetic one, too. Dr. Gösele, to whom I owe these beautiful pictures, confirmed to me the impression of an astronomical night shot, which other viewers also feel. With a courageous crop you get there:

    At a certain crop the fundus of a human eye seen in laser light resembles and emission nebula with a star in its center. © Julian Köpke

    This is how the central part of my sensor looks like when creating photographs or X-rays. My wife immediately urged me not to fall into a narcissistic trap ….

  • Macro,  Monochrome,  X-Ray

    Chestnuts X-ray mammography photo

    I hav been looking forward to the mammography of these chestnuts a whole week. It was almost too late to find some specimen that had not yet been trampled or eaten. Once again it was helping hands that made this picture possible for me.

    It was difficult to get an attractive composition. Indeed some skills have to be developed to place the chestnuts – because they really hurt. The sensor was too small to x-ray the whole composition at once. The solution was a mosaic with two tiles.

    The result is convincing to me. The viewer may feel the thorns looking at the image. 

    Chestnut X-ray mammography photo © Julian Köpke
  • iPhoneography,  Macro,  Print

    Stages of a print

    „Print early – print often“: important advice given by Charles Cramer. With my battery of my Nikon empty we strolled along a cornfield. A broken corn cob  in a mature field suddenly caught my attention. The characteristic envelopes were partially peeled off. Red threads, which children use for playing as hair, hung tangled down. So I took my iPhone to get this image done.

    Cornfield Ruit © Julian Köpke

    Beside the original with rogue disturbing lights I did some dodging and burning to enhance the print. This first step is the most important before getting into any other filtering process:

    Cornfield with "rogue lights" © Julian Köpke
    Cornfield with compensated "rouge lights" © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Lightbox,  Macro,  Monochrome,  Texture

    Farewell

    With flowers we create feelings and express feelings. With flowers we want to elicit feelings. If they aren’t just a comfortable souvenir, that is not suitable for the wall or the shelf.

    Their color is not enough to stimulate our emotions. It’s also their shape and a composition.  I took a friend to my favorite florist to design a bouquet from the available flowers end of September. The central component were two specimens of a cockscomb, one in red and one in purple.

    Celosia or cockscomb © Julian Köpke

    A not insignificant part of the enjoyment is the creation of the composition, together with a sensitive florist. At home I photographed the bouquet with the horizontally aligned, rectangular Lightbox in the background. It’s, of course, an HDR image, combined of shots with the Lightbox switched on and off. A final greeting of the noticeably farewell summer.

    Bouquet with celiosa © Julian Köpke

    Farewell has always been a theme of flowers. Without color, subject only to the effect of light, exposing a feeling for the original color, the black-and-white image of a flower becomes intensified. The same day at sunset, with an exposure speed of 6 minutes at ISO 50, I obtained the following picture, which made me immediately think of The Godfather: I’ll make him an offer he can’t refuse.

    Rose © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Lightbox,  Macro

    Gift

    It had take a long time until I had chosen a beautiful floral arrangement and d the florist had bound it presentably. I was just about to complete the purchase when I noticed a wonderful Gladiole.

    „I’ll give it to you for free of charge, it has already fully blossomed“, said the owner. My thanks to her are the following pictures of this flower, which I made with my lightbox in the background.

    Gladiola © Julian Köpke
    Gladiola © Julian Köpke
    Gladiola © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Lightbox,  Macro

    Last hot summer days

    The last hot summer days are noticeably less hot. Autumn shows up on my rose hips, which are still fed by the water of a vase. Over the course of the days her leaf green became increasingly discolored in autumn. I don’t want to believe it.

    Delicate rose hips before autumn starts © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Lightbox,  Macro,  Monochrome,  Texture

    Artichoke

    Melitta was looking for an image in her new kitchen. She felt a fusion image of a fruit basket to be too dark. The fusion image technique is not restricted to black and white or monochrome (FAQ: Fusion imaging). With only few structural content in the X-ray of the fruits I better inverted the background of the image and sponsored a golden backdrop like an ancient greek icon. You still can see some X-ray properties looking at the lychees or the bananas. As a print its appearance was best.

    X-ray fusion photo of lychees and fruit in a wooden bowl © Julian Köpke

    Also appropriate for a kitchen would also be an image of an artichoke. If I put it on a lightbox, there is always some resemblance to a copperplate print, which I like personally. This blooming artichoke is a type of a food image, if you spend some phantasy.

    Blooming artichoke © Julian Köpke

    A little change of perspective gives more direct access to the blooms. Every image shown in this blog entry is a combination of manual HDR and software assisted HDR. That way I get best results. The background helps to create the look and feel of ageing and simulating a print.

    Blooming artichoke © Julian Köpke

    The artichoke presented above has some resemblance to a thistle. By chance we have a place not far from home with lots of them. Old railroad tracks had been removed and converted into bike trails nearby our house. So we went this morning by bike to get a thistle of the former track bed for an image.

    Blooming thistle at the former railroad tracks © Julian Köpke

    As there is so much structure in these images, I felt tempted to convert my artichoke and thistle images into monochrome. To some extent they resemble images of Karl Blossfeldt.

    Blooming artichoke © Julian Köpke
    Blooming thistle at the former railroad tracks © Julian Köpke
  • General,  Macro,  reflection

    Play of colors and light

    In our garden is a small fountain just beneath a hedge. A remarkable number of birds showed up to drink or to take a shower in it. The urge of the birds to bathe there was always stronger than the fear of our presence. What do they see in the fountain ? I couldn’t imagine an answer until today.

    Great Titmouse (Kohlmeise) © Julian Köpke
    Crow in our garden © Julian Köpke

    Today I made macro images of the fountain with a wide variation of exposure values to find a small world within it. Many of my fountain images remind me of the night sky and its wonders. Sometimes I had to think of our universe.

    The birds might see this ? I cannot be sure. But they are not blind, for sure.

    A macro of our fountain appears like a painting under many exposure conditions. A first glance of four images is presented here. 

  • flowers,  Macro

    Astilbe

    An Astilbe has an umbel-shaped inflorescence and therefore consists of countless small blooms. While blooming, its structure is extremely delicate and light. It looks as if spotted in the light that shines through everywhere. An Astilbe seems to be floating. What a delighting gift to get such a plant from my preferred flower dealer.

    Blooming Astilbe in a vase © Julian Köpke
    Blooming Astilbe © Julian Köpke

    I had planned to reproduce this impression photographically. The three-dimensional impression of the human eyes is a complete different reality than a two-dimensional photograph. My photographs didn’t seem as delicate and fragile as the original.

    The richness of the flower structure better unfolds in image crops. The resolution of my PhaseOne is high enough to have sufficient quality available in a cropped image.

    Blooming Astilbe © Julian Köpke
    Blooming Astilbe © Julian Köpke