• Iceland,  Landscape,  Travel

    Glaciers

    Long days in Iceland with a time difference of 2 hours to Germany. It’s light here, while at home those who stayed at home go to bed.
    Early in the morning we started our tour to the lagoon of Hoffellsjökull. There is no tourist infrastructure, the car has to have a lot of ground clearance and the tyres have to be well inflated to reach the lagoon.
    A harmonious light situation awaited us today, light cloud cover making the sunlight a little more diffuse. The contrasts of the icebergs were clear.

    The constantly changing light through the clouds made the icebergs alternately light and dark. The consistent structures were brought to life by the permanent change of light.

    Morning at Hoffellsjökull glacier lagoon © Julian Köpke

    Changing the lens is not a change of perspective. Nevertheless, the change is worthwhile, because the higher focal length has the effect of enlarging a section. The change of light does its part.

    Morning at Hoffellsjökull glacier lagoon © Julian Köpke

    The drive to Skalafellsjökull via the F985 pass road was somewhat adventurous. Although our Japanese car kept making very different beeps and noises, the meaning of which we could not always identify, the car was technically usable for this road.

    At the top we found a base camp for glacier tours with snowmobiles. A short walk over rocks of all shapes and sizes brought us to the edge of the glacier. A cool, almost constant wind blew around our ears. Gloves were great for working with the camera. With a rather dull light I created a panorama of the early glacier.

    Glacier Skalafellsjökull at the end of F985 © Julian Köpke

    The most impressive structures of the glacier are found crosswise and lengthwise to the flow and are called „ogives“ resp. „band ogives“. We had already admired their charm many times on the ascent. We devoted ourselves to them on the descent.

    Glacier Skalafellsjökull ogives and some band ogives © Julian Köpke
  • Iceland,  Landscape,  Travel

    Eystrahorn

    Besides the Vestrahorn near Höfn, there is the Eystrahorn near Hvalnes, situated right next to a lighthouse. The bay at Hvalnes was windless, sunny and warm. Just as we turned east at the lighthouse, the weather abruptly changed to stormy, cloudy and cold. It took me 3/4 of an hour to safely photograph the mountain group, because clouds obstructed the view.

    Fragile clouds at Eystrahorn beneath Hvalnes Lighthouse © Julian Köpke

    The view to the west shows the peninsula, the sea and Vestrahorn in the distance. The fragility of the weather situation is not noticeable in this direction.

    Hvalnes beach and peninsula beneath Eystrahorn. Vestrahorn at the horizon. © Julian Köpke

    In the evening it became increasingly overcast and the prospects of seeing the abundantly announced auroras sank into the bottomless pit. The clouds were coloured by the evening glow. Hotel guests gathered on the terrace to greet the sunset with many photos.

    Evening at Fosshotel Vatnajökull © Julian Köpke
  • Iceland,  Landscape,  Travel

    Patterns and glacial flows

    This morning we were far from convinced to book a photographic sightseeing flight. Because the clouds were hanging 20m above the ground when we left our hotel. The closer we got to Skaftfell, the brighter it became, but still plenty cloudy. Only on the peaks of Vatnajökull was there plenty of sun.

    The experienced pilot was sure we would have fun. And so it came to pass. Because our pilot liked to take pictures from the air himself and knew exactly how to get the best light conditions in front of our lens in the clearing weather. How impressive it was may be understood by pointing out my rapidly aching hands, which from focusing, positioning the camera and releasing the shutter on both sides had me feeling the saddle joints after only half an hour.

    Our flight was a complete success thanks to this young pilot whose machine was more than twice his age. Only the engine was new, he said.

    Glacial flows and patterns on Iceland © Julian Köpke

    After crossing the first glacier flow, we reached the glacier itself. With the old Cessan we slowly crept up the glacier. I felt reminded of films where the altitude limit is reached and the hero has to dare to jump. The cold downdraft winds were hard on the plane, but the pilot still guided us safely up the slope.

    The sight of a glacier reminds me of frozen waves that take you up and down with power. The frozen glacier seems less dangerous, almost still.

    Flying up the glacier Vatnajökull © Julian Köpke

    We left the glacier area again to approach the glacier lagoon Jökullsarlon. From above, everything looks small, I didn’t even notice the many icebergs I would later find from the plane.

    Flight from Vatnajökull to Jökullsarlon © Julian Köpke

    In one hour I took 700 pictures, which is about 50 GBytes of data. At the end, the exhaustion of the hands and body was noticeable. We only had bananas and nuts for breakfast, as we had to leave the hotel before breakfast. Fortunately, we had gloves, scarf and hats to brave the cold that came in through the open plane windows.

    Glacial flows and patterns on Iceland © Julian Köpke

    Deep sleep had been indicated and possible before the evening excursion. With a small diversions via Hafnarnesviti lighthouse, we reached the Viking Café in Stocksness at 11 pm. Many cars took the same route. Northern lights at Vestrahorn were the final destination for all. For the first time I experienced polar lights with my cam under clear skies.

    Polarlights at Stocksness © Julian Köpke
    Polarlights at Stocksness © Julian Köpke
  • Landscape,  Travel

    Skogafoss

    Our first stop is Skogafoss, which we had already visited last year. At that time we were almost alone. Today it is crowded like at the Oktoberfest. Along the outflow of the waterfall, I moved along the bank of the current with the tripod forward to somehow capture the overwhelming scale of this place.

    Skogafoss © Julian Köpke

    In front of each monument you may recognize people posing or acting. If you wait long enough, there is always an opportunity for a special picture that shows the scale of the force of nature and the relative tininess of human appearance.

    Skogafoss © Julian Köpke

    In Reynisfjara at Black Sand beach we find flow that has become stone. Basal columns and many variations of them, to be viewed from above and marvelled at from below. Frozen movement shows the past time of unbridled geological power.

    Reynisfjara basalt formation © Julian Köpke
    Reynisfjara basalt formation © Julian Köpke

    The basalt columns on Reynisfjara beach are a place of joy for all those who have made the long journey there. Is there anything more beautiful than climbing on the rocks and being photographed ?

    I experienced a moment of peace in the Verzasca Valley in Ticino. It was late afternoon and I had climbed down close to the stream to take a picture of the rocks and their reflection in the Verzasca in a pool of greenish light. What a joy this morning, because the picture was put into the explore stream of Flickr.

  • General,  Landscape,  Travel

    Iceland

    The prospects are good: with high probability northern lights are announced for tomorrow and the following days in Iceland. We had wished for northern lights, but in no way expected to see any, nor to be able to photograph them.

    Our first day of travel starts with a seven and a half hour delay of the plane. A short wait turned into a long day with lots of sun outside and little movement in the lounge.

    „Have camera, will travel.“ I can’t get this sentence out of my head. The prospects are good: beautiful Icelandic landscape and auroras with high probability.

    Have camera, will travel. © Julian Köpke
    Probability for Northern Lights
  • Monochrome

    Quiet time in Black Forest

    What happens to green leaves when I turn them into black and white? Again and again I photographed ferns. During a hike in the Black Forest I photographed groups of different leaves with different shades of green and brightness.

    The result was clear to me beforehand. I had found such an idea in the images of Ansel Adams

    Forest floor © Julian Köpke

    Less subtle is the following motif with a wooden bench for tired hikers. In this image the fern, the bench and the stone marker are the brightest objects.

    Bench and fern at forest path Obertal © Julian Köpke

    Different hues of green lead to different levels of brightness in the black and white cosmos. Our destination for the day was Lake Buhlbach, which unfortunately could no longer be circumnavigated on foot in the newly opened national park.

    Reflections in a pond (Buhlbachsee) © Julian Köpke
  • Architecture,  Travel

    Oslo

    Our journey to the Land of the Midnight Sun starts in Oslo. The hotel is just a stone’s throw from the harbour. lot of rain and constantly changing light from more or less dense clouds greet us. Because we don’t want to miss anything, we start our first tour right after arrival, despite a certain tiredness.

    The first building that caught  our eyes is the opera. Built with Carrara marble is white.

    Operaen Oslo (Opera house) © Julian Köpke
    Operaen Oslo (Opera house) © Julian Köpke

    A sculpture in the middle of the harbor attracted me. It took me some moments to see the resemblance to a painting of Caspar David Friedrich („Eismeer“).

    Failed Hope (Sculpture inspired by "Eismeer" by C.D. Friedrich). A flexible mounted sculpture in the harbour of Oslo. Light is different every moment: it will be never the same. © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Lightbox,  Macro

    White and purple orchid

    My LED ceiling light, which I use as a light box for flower photography, can be dimmed and the color temperature is adjustable. The cold and extremely bright light can be tamed and turned into faint, warm light. Together with my tent of linen, I manage to control the light.
    With LiveView, the composition is created and the focus is worked out. The camera is controlled by cable connection via laptop (tethered shooting) and the recordings are made with mirror triggering. The colors become better and the impression of the picture more natural and vivid.

    White and purple orchid © Julian Köpke
  • Architecture,  General,  Travel

    Fragile in Amsterdam

    A lot of things are falling apart these days. We feel how fragile we are. How do you show fragility in a picture ?

    Entering the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, a new, modern entrance area has been created. Light and shadow in rapid succession through concrete door arches.

    Entrance Rijksmuseum Amsterdam © Julian Köpke

    The arches are unadorned, yet the eye clings to them. Despite – or due to ? – the simple concept, every perspective offers new impression.

    Entrance Rijksmuseum Amsterdam © Julian Köpke

    A still life painting (not „life style“) may be irritating by its compositional elements, like objects at the edge of a table top. Just these elements evokes a feeling of fragility. The next image is a photograph I made in the museum without tripod as indicated. The painting by Willem Claeszoon Heda was about 1635. It is a Vanitas theme, 13 years before the end of a 80 years long war in Netherlands, the end coinciding with the 30 years long war in Germany 1648.

    Nature morte Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands By Willem Claeszoon Heda 1635. Photograph. © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Heidelberg

    Sunny day with spring character

    A sunny day in winter without training or weekend obligations: we can let ourselves drift a littleThe Hermannshof in Weinheim with its botanical garden attracts many visitors, especially those with cameras. Many kneel or lie down on the floor to gain a beautiful perspective. You don’t notice dirty trousers. Rather, trousers like that ennobles the wearer.

    First light welcomes a crocus when the sun shines abundantly and the joy of photographing is written on the face of all visitors.

    First light for a crocus © Julian Köpke

    Winter residual flowers in the first spring light: Helleborus

    Helleborus © Julian Köpke

    At the end of our sunny stroll we sat down in front of a café for a tea. We met this Siberian Husky in front of our café. It took me a while to recognize three legs and a shaved fur on her right hip. Due to a chondrosarcoma her owner had decided to have an operation on the dog. She did quite well, as far as a human may understand.

    Siberian Husky © Julian Köpke
    Siberian Husky © Julian Köpke