Landscape,  Long time exposure,  Sylt,  Travel

Sylt

Two more days on the island. I had secretly speculated before the start of the trip to be able to make interesting longtime exposures of the sea. We went to the sea once very early and often late at night. On Friday, the 13th, the weather was particularly stormy. I felt that half a second exposure time was the optimal value to capture the dynamics of the sea’s motion and at the same time to get structure.

La mer © Julian Köpke

Many of the photographs I took with the quadrupeds, which were laid out as a coastal protection near Hörnum. Depending on the time of day and the weather, they are a fantastic backdrop. This image was taken early in the morning short after sunrise.

Shape of tetrapodes, Hörnum © Julian Köpke

At the time of the highest water level during the flood, these concrete blocks almost disappear underneath the water surface. The next image is a combination of different exposure values to express the power of the incoming tide.

Tide is coming in at Hörnum beach, Sylt © Julian Köpke

Without wind, the sea is so calm at low tide that you don’t want to imply anything violent to it anymore. To capture the calm of the low tide water I needed 30s of exposure time. However, the Moon would become blurred at that value. So combined two shots into one picture.

Evening and waxing crescent Moon at Hörnum beach, Sylt. Longtime exposure 1s and 30s. © Julian Köpke

Weather change is associated with stronger wind and light changes. This situation is often felt on the island in rather pleasant way.

Thunderstorm building on the horizon © Julian Köpke

I like to make things visible the naked eye isn't able to see. That's part of my profession as a radiologist, too.

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