• Fusion imaging,  X-Ray

    New wine X-ray photo of Pinot Noir

    The expression „new wine“ is ambiguous in the German language. On the one hand, this refers to grape juice that has not yet begun to ferment. On the other hand, this means the freshly harvested grapes.

    By chance we were given a delivery of fresh harvested grapes of the Pinot Noir variety, which we immediately subjected to an X-ray examination. An additional photograph of the composition from below the exit point of the X-rays was taken quickly with a Leica Q.

    The result of this image fusion is shown here:

    Pinot noir X-ray fusion image © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Monochrome,  X-Ray

    X-ray photos of grapes and sunflowers

    Grapes as an object of X-raying have been inspiring me for a long time. Their structure remind the doctor of the azini of a gland or lung. The phycisist likes very much the partial and complete overlays alternating with free positions. As an artist I get an unbelievable freedom of image design.

    My first X-ray imaging attempts with grapes were carried aout in October 2017. I’d forgotten !

    Can something succesful be repeated ? Can it be deepened ? What is the power of the composition ?

    Grapes picture in Hologic calendar September 2019 © Julian Köpke
    Grapes - creative representation of an X-ray with Lab color © Julian Köpke
    Grape X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    Two days ago I tried toput my creativity into the composition. Two pictures were taken from grapes which differ only slightly. Their X-ray view on our monitor had a clearly different effect.

    Grapes X-ray photo X-ray mammography photo © Julian Köpke
    Grapes composition II X-ray mammography photo © Julian Köpke

    My colleague by chance showed up with a bouquet of small sunflowers with long stalks. Amazing opportunity !

    I dedicate this X-ray of a bouquet of sunflowers to my colleague Dr. Arendt. © Julian Köpke
    Bouquet of Sunflowers X-ray photo © Julian Köpke
  • Monochrome,  X-Ray

    Vegetables X-ray photography

    Harold implanted the idea of X-rays with onions in me. Although more than covered with professional requirements, I tried my hand at vegetable x-ray photography.

    I can say it’s fun. Although a defective screen had to be replaced at the beginning. And you need some patience. Not every shot shows its beauty from the beginning. Some have to be developed first.

    Let’s start with a corncob. It has many outer leaf layers, which lie close to it. X-rays look through and show the layers at the edge of the bulb as fine lines.

    Corncob X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    Here is a comparison of X-ray on the left side versus Mammography on the right side. A Belgian endive and a lettuce show much more contrast and fine structure in a mammography whereas X-ray gives more the impression of softness. Which goes well for a salad.

    Chickory (Belgian endive) and lettuce X-ray photo © Julian Köpke
    Chickory (Belgian endive) and lettuce mammography X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    Onions have a lot of liquid and are therefore radiopaque. I was curious to see which method  would make it better to reveal the layerstructure of the onions. To my surprise mammography did a pretty good job.

     

    Onions mammography X-ray photo © Julian Köpke
    Onions mammography X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    Conventional X-ray offers more mystery, especially when you stack onions.

    Stacked onions X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    Some kind of layered structure also has fennel. I got two specimen that looked like mittens.

    Fennel © Julian Köpke

    This year we had so many apples in our garden. They are red and look juicy. I had the chance to take two of them to my X-ray machine. With the help of two different orientations an interesting picture succeeds, because on of the apples still has a small branch.

    May be there is some truth in the saying: an apple a day keeps the doctor away. But as the dentist would say: no teeth, no apple.

    Sleeping beauty's choice © Julian Köpke
    An apple a day keeps the doctor away © Julian Köpke
  • Fusion imaging,  X-Ray

    Spider conch X-ray fusion photo

    A friend gave me a shell of a spider conch to make more fusion images. The scientific name of the spider conch is lambis lambis and it is a sea snail. There is a nice Wikipedia article on it.

    The hard shell with a lot of radiopaque lime made me doubt the success of my X-rays. On top, my first attempt at a HighKey image wasn’t really convincing. Only the combination of a normal photography for the color, a HighKey image for a transparency effect together with the X-ray image resulted in nice image.

    Fusion image spider conch X-ray and photo seen from the bottom © Julian Köpke
    Fusion image spider conch (lambis lambis) X-ray and photo seen from above © Julian Köpke

    The X-ray image appear less lively, but full of formal power. The orientation of the animal is conveyed by the photographically reproduced color. There are only minimal hints wich orientation the X-ray has.

    These are the corresponding X-ray images:

    Spider conch (lambis lambis) © Julian Köpke
    Spider conch (lambis lambis) © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Fusion imaging,  Lightbox,  X-Ray

    Orchid X-ray fusion photo

    It feels like very long ago. Harold and I were taking the shots and X-rays of new compositions last week of  April this year. Our first try was an orchid with two stems. The transparency effect is very much augmented using an X-ray. A stem behind petals doesn’t show easily in HDR light box photography.

    With a Phase One camera at my disposal a strong crop of the composition shows the tenderness of our orchid much better. With a resolution still sufficient.

    Orchid fusion X-ray photo © Julian Köpke
  • Travel,  X-Ray

    Leipzig X-ray Convention

    Since 1905 there is an X-ray meeting in Germany. It was the 100th time this year. Nowadays the convention takes place every year.

    Besides the scientific news the convention offers the opportunity of caring for personal contacts. It is part of the beautiful things of the convention to meet old acquaintances and to exchange with them.

    Leipzig fair is a great environment for this event. An agreeable tiredness affects me at the end of the day after many positive conversations. I left the celebration with relief.

    Leipzig fair at sunset © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Fusion imaging

    Purple Clematis

    Long lasting blossoms, turning up every year: my purple clematis in our garden.

    It was my third X-ray session with flowers this week. Third fusion imaging attempt. After blue cornflower and blue aquilegia now a purple clematis. Big data on my hard disk.

    Today we did it with mammography at 30 kV and 50 mAs. Lower noise ! Here is the positive representation of a single clematis:

    Clematis X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    I processed the lightbox HighKey series with a mask. There was a shift of 2 or 3 pixels from the lightest to the darker images. So I processed everything a second time to compensate for the shift. The HDR image shows a cut stalk. Photoshop is made for this.

    Purple Clematis © Julian Köpke

    The stalk can be lengthened like in the preceding X-ray. The fusion image shows hidden leaves, the core of the blossom and stalks much better:

    Purple Clematis X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke

    The flower looks pretty fragile now, close to its natural appearance.

  • Fusion imaging,  Lightbox,  X-Ray

    Spring and X-ray fusion photos

    First flowers in spring show up. With much support from my colleagues I’m able to do some fusion images. We all would like to have another calendar.

    Preparing the lightbox, the X-ray machines, my camera and picking out the data is a bunch of hassle.

    My personal favorite is the blue cornflower. It looks like a print of an old botanic book:

    Cornflower X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke

    The next day I turned my attention to our white and blue Aquilegias. No chance to process the raw data yesterday. Eventually, there was a chance today, after quite a bit of tedious work at my desk:

    Blue aquilegia X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke
  • X-ray images

    Digital X-ray photo of a sunflower (inverted representation). © Julian Köpke
    X-ray three tulips © Julian Köpke
    Nautilus shell as a vessel © Julian Köpke
    Five Dahlias X-ray photo © Julian Köpke
    Nautilus X-Ray Energy Compressed © Julian Köpke
    Odyssey © Julian Köpke
    Nautilus shell 3D Digital X-ray Photo tilted beam © Julian Köpke
  • X-Ray

    Gradients and X-ray tubes

    Fusion imaging is a method full of surprise. My red calla lilies revealed an effect I had forgotten completely. There must be a gradient in every X-ray exposure.

    Preparing a fusion image composition with my 6 red calla lilies I found a troublesome gradient in the X-ray. 

    Gradient in an X-ray of 6 red calla lilies © Julian Köpke

    The cause for the gradient is a weakening of X-ray radiation at its origin in the X-ray tube. A closer look at the phenomenon can be found in my FAQ. This effect of variable recording of photons phycisists call „anode heel effect“.

    As part of my creative process I rotated the composition shown above by 180 degrees and exposed it a second time with the same parameters. Note that post-production as well was done equally for both X-ray exposures !

    Gradient in an X-ray of 6 red calla lilies, inverted for creative reasons © Julian Köpke