• flowers,  Fusion imaging

    Purple Clematis

    Long lasting blossoms, turning up every year: my purple clematis in our garden.

    It was my third X-ray session with flowers this week. Third fusion imaging attempt. After blue cornflower and blue aquilegia now a purple clematis. Big data on my hard disk.

    Today we did it with mammography at 30 kV and 50 mAs. Lower noise ! Here is the positive representation of a single clematis:

    Clematis X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    I processed the lightbox HighKey series with a mask. There was a shift of 2 or 3 pixels from the lightest to the darker images. So I processed everything a second time to compensate for the shift. The HDR image shows a cut stalk. Photoshop is made for this.

    Purple Clematis © Julian Köpke

    The stalk can be lengthened like in the preceding X-ray. The fusion image shows hidden leaves, the core of the blossom and stalks much better:

    Purple Clematis X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke

    The flower looks pretty fragile now, close to its natural appearance.

  • Fusion imaging,  Lightbox,  X-Ray

    Spring and X-ray fusion photos

    First flowers in spring show up. With much support from my colleagues I’m able to do some fusion images. We all would like to have another calendar.

    Preparing the lightbox, the X-ray machines, my camera and picking out the data is a bunch of hassle.

    My personal favorite is the blue cornflower. It looks like a print of an old botanic book:

    Cornflower X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke

    The next day I turned my attention to our white and blue Aquilegias. No chance to process the raw data yesterday. Eventually, there was a chance today, after quite a bit of tedious work at my desk:

    Blue aquilegia X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke
  • X-ray images

    Digital X-ray photo of a sunflower (inverted representation). © Julian Köpke
    X-ray three tulips © Julian Köpke
    Nautilus shell as a vessel © Julian Köpke
    Five Dahlias X-ray photo © Julian Köpke
    Nautilus X-Ray Energy Compressed © Julian Köpke
    Odyssey © Julian Köpke
    Nautilus shell 3D Digital X-ray Photo tilted beam © Julian Köpke
  • X-Ray

    Red calla lilies

    Sometimes reality falls behind our expectations. With 6 red calla lilies I felt well prepared to do some new X-rays and HDR images for image fusion. But my X-ray system surprisingly raised a barrier. The main computer stopped doing his job. 

    Many thoughts ran through my brain. Will we be able to examine patients the next day ? How fast the supplier will be able to react ? Will the company find a cause of this disturbance ? How many days will my calla lilies be alive ?

    I found a work-around by thinking over the interacting hardware. Doing some steps and with a newly restarted system I was able to create 7 different compositions without further disruption of which I show here No. 4.

    With X-rays emerges a more impressive illusion of transparency than a plain HDR would have been able to produce. Even when using a lightbox.

    Similar to a lightbox it produces better results when laying a petal or a complete blossom over the top of the stalk of another one.

    On top of the longest stalk is a twin blossom !

    Fusion X-ray photo Calla lilies IV © Julian Köpke

    You never know if the inversion in Lab colors leads to an attractive result. It’s always worth looking at Lab color transformations. In this case the black background yields vivid colors.

    Fusion X-ray photo Calla lilies IV. Black background using Lab inversion. © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  General

    Red calla lilies

    With my new glasses in my pocket I gazed the nearby market place on Saturday. I was captivated by six red callas whose price I could knock down to 10€ for all of them.

    With my Zeiss 50mm Macro lens and no tripod I was trying to get nice shapes late in the evening. The following images have been processed using Lab color to enhance contrast and colors.

    Calla lilies III © Julian Köpke

    Just normal light of our living room let me to a nice coloring and interesting shapes. The blossom next to the lower right corner is a Siamese twin on a double stalk.

    Calla lilies with a twin blossom right hand side atop a twin stalk. © Julian Köpke
  • X-Ray

    X-ray exam of stone age tusk

    A couple of days ago I went to see a friend who knows my weakness for X-ray examinations. He gave me a mammoth tusk. At first glance I doubted if there would be any possibility to produce an image because of the estimated high density of this stone age tooth.

    So I decided to try a CT scan. I had some butterflies in my tummy and feared an artistic disaster. Indeed, the first slices emerging from our scanner weren’t much convincing. As a first step of postproduction My technician and I decided to do a volume rendering of the 0.75mm slices. We got a surprisingly good result that showed interesting details of the inner structure of this biological remnant.

    Tip of a mammoth tusk (CT scan, VRT and Photoshop) © Julian Köpke

    A tusk is a tooth of the upper jaw of the mammoth (or elephant). A major blood vessel branching off while running to the tip can easily be seen. The caves on right hand side are assumed to stabilize this life long weapon of a mammoth.

    This tusk has been stone age ivory and consists mostly of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate.

    As there is no restriction to trading of mammoth ivory there is an increasing amount of siberian stone age ivory emerging to the market.

  • Lightbox,  X-Ray

    X-ray fusion photo of a Nautilus

    Fusion imaging can be done retrospective. My split Nautilus shell on a light box rendered with manual HDR shows already a nice structure of the inner parts. 

    Nautilus shell manual HDR photo on a light box © Julian Köpke

    The X-ray obtained a couple of days earlier easily fits onto the HDR with not a big deal of processing.

    Nautilus X-Ray Energy Compressed © Julian Köpke

    The meaning of the fusion image may be different to the flowers. But it’s feasible to do it retrospectively.

    Nautilus shell fusion X-ray photo and manual HDR photo on a light box. © Julian Köpke
  • X-Ray

    Tilted Nautilus X-ray photo

    Imagine a Nautilus shell tilted to the surface of the X-ray sensor. The parts close to the sensor are sharp, the distant parts unsharp. Because the X-ray beam creates a central projection. The focal plane is the plane of the sensor, in focus are those parts close to the sensor.

    The shell looks like entering the image or leaving it.

    Tilted Nautilus digital X-ray photo. © Julian Köpke
  • X-Ray

    Nautilus shell X-ray fusion photo of energy levels

    Different energies of X-ray radiation mean different transparency of an object. There is an example in my FAQ using a Nautilus shell.

    Instead of compressing images of different energies to a single image today I subtracted the 70 kV image of a Nautilus shell from the 40 kV image.

    The central parts of the Nautilus shell are more dense and show a significant higher difference. The core of the shell gets shiny. This is how it looks like:

    Energy difference X-ray photo of a Nautilus shell. The image is the difference of a 70kV and a 40 kV image. © Julian Köpke

    In positive X-ray representation you can compare the results. Left hand is the compressed image of 4 different energy levels, right hand the difference image.

    Nautilus X-Ray Energy Compressed © Julian Köpke
    Energy difference X-ray photo of a Nautilus shell. The fusion image is the difference of a 70kV and a 40 kV image in X-ray positive representation. © Julian Köpke
  • X-Ray

    Dahlias fusion X-ray HDR photo

    Long time ago my friend Harold and I did these X-rays in my practice. There was so much to do. Today was a chance to process the fusion images. Some details can be found in my FAQs.

    The manual HDR is already appealing to our eyes.

    Dahlias using manual HDR in visible light

    There is some charm in the X-ray image of the same composition. The hidden parts of the stalks can be clearly seen. 

    Five Dahlias X-ray photo © Julian Köpke

    The fusion image of this composition shows both color and hidden structures.

    Dahlias fusion digital X-ray with manual HDR photo in visible light

    Finished image with a background:

    Dahlias fusion digital X-ray and manual HDR photo with background © Julian Köpke