• Lightbox,  X-Ray

    X-ray fusion photo of a Nautilus

    Fusion imaging can be done retrospective. My split Nautilus shell on a light box rendered with manual HDR shows already a nice structure of the inner parts. 

    Nautilus shell manual HDR photo on a light box © Julian Köpke

    The X-ray obtained a couple of days earlier easily fits onto the HDR with not a big deal of processing.

    Nautilus X-Ray Energy Compressed © Julian Köpke

    The meaning of the fusion image may be different to the flowers. But it’s feasible to do it retrospectively.

    Nautilus shell fusion X-ray photo and manual HDR photo on a light box. © Julian Köpke
  • Lightbox

    Primroses

    I felt very much attracted by these primroses. They were close to purple and red and I could see them already as a beautiful print.

    But how photographing them on a lightbox ? They always toppled over. Many efforts were useless. Blossoms tend to move, always.

    On this photograph I put the blossoms top-down. Because any arrangement could be done then. It works !

    Purple Primroses © Julian Köpke

    A different color show the orange primroses. Composition with or without leaves ? Without gives more the impression of a painting.

    Primroses II © Julian Köpke
    Primroses I © Julian Köpke
  • Lightbox

    Three vetches

    X-ray images give an insight into the inner (or hidden) structure of a flower. HDR images on a light box are quite close to this. 

    Today I wanted to show the softness of petals and went to my dealer. She sold me three vetches, not really expensive for the purpose. 

    This is my third composition today of the three vetches on my lightbox. The play of the light in the petals resembles to some extent X-ray images.

    Three vetches © Julian Köpke
  • Lightbox

    End of wintertime

    Our weather is more and more weird. Today was the second day with a warm sun and a blue sky. Nights are getting pretty cold, days up to 25 degrees Celsius.

    Cleaning up our garden led us to some old physalis which were a little more than a skeleton. In autumn these fruits look like lanterns, now they resemble an X-ray.

    I did this shot on a lightbox using manual HDR technique.In Lab color mode I obtained this image with a pur black background.

    It’s an exoskeleton for the fruit inside which remains that way without bruises.

    Physalis after winter has gone. © Julian Köpke
  • Lightbox

    Mediterranean creatures on a lightbox

    Today I put some tests on my cretean purchases from last September to evaluate their potential of being subject to fusion imaging. I bought three Nautilus shells and two sea snails, holding them in the store against the sun to check their transparency. My untidy studio accommodated these precious stones under quite a bunch of something.

    The best representation is with a black background, i.e. with inverted L-channel in Lab colors. With a black background a soft shining light appears in the objects.

    This snail has a shape a triangle and resembles a bear claw or an Apollo capsule in the late Sixties. The translucency is very little.

    Cretean Snail © Julian Köpke
    Cretean Snail © Julian Köpke

    The following snail has a classic shape. With the black background it resembles a galaxy in outer space.

    Mediterranean Snail II © Julian Köpke
    Mediterranean Snail II © Julian Köpke

    My first attempt with the Nautilus shells led me to a copper-like color representation with a single shot image. Lab colors is the key to this color and light distribution. Very attractive is the fact of two shells turning right and one left. Why did I wait so long to make this image ? Why do we miss important opportunities ?

    Three Nautilus shells with light inverison © Julian Köpke
    Three Nautilus shells with light inverison © Julian Köpke