I like to make things visible the naked eye isn't able to see. That's part of my profession as a radiologist, too.

  • Fusion imaging,  X-Ray

    New X-ray fusion photo compositions

    New year, new ideas. A superbe bowl of fruits inspired me to do more X-ray fusion photography today. I got a bundle of bananas, lots of lychees, two pears, figs, an apple and a pomegranate.

    I changed my technique a bit. There is no chance to get a transparent banana image using a photo. But mixing the colors of the photo with the X-ray is also a fusion image. To my opinion, the bananas came out lovely, especially the color of the trunk.

    Fusion X-ray photo of bananas © Julian Köpke

    I like stills. They often come with a fruit bowl. My first attempt was a fruit bowl without lychees. The structure of an orange or a pomegranate is known to me from earlier X-ray studies. And I liked the grain of the wooden bowl.

    The following fusion image is resulting:

    Fruit bowl X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke

    This is the first time I tried to x-ray lychees. I piled them up in my wooden bowl. That way it was a bit less complicated to transport them for photography. They shouldn’t move at all between X-ray and photography session. I was lucky.

    X-ray fusion photo of lychees in a wooden bowl © Julian Köpke

    Combining lychees, bananas, a pear and two figs in a fusion image yields a color explosion in the fusion image.

    X-ray fusion photo of lychees and fruit in a wooden bowl © Julian Köpke

    Last but not least an X-ray fusion photo of all fruit. Color explosion by means of Lab color. The dark blue at the image edges  is a good counterweight to the intense yellow of the pears and bananas.

    Fruit X-ray fusion photo © Julian Köpke

    See also my FAQ section to learn more about fusion imaging with X-ray and photography.

  • Landscape,  reflection,  Travel

    Ammersee in wintertime

    Our last day should be sunny. It started foggy with the rising sun. Landscape photography gets painterly without much processing efforts. 

    Church St. Martin in Herrsching © Julian Köpke

    Some kilometers further in Aidenried we explored our well known landing stage. Attracted by an impressive reflection of the Marienmünster in Dießen I made two compositions. The first contains just the central part of the second image.

    Marienmünster with fog in winter © Julian Köpke

    Before leaving this spot the second image contains a more outlined cross composition. Both images remind of colored old engravings.

    Winter morning with fog at Ammersee (Marienmünster) © Julian Köpke

    After a walk along the newly piled up dam it became afternoon and the light more reddish. From the landing stage of Seehaus Riederau we could see the Alps at the horizon.

    Alps behind Ammersee © Julian Köpke
  • Long time exposure,  Texture,  Travel,  World at night

    Painterly strokes or magnetic fields ?

    A short trip for recreation in Bavaria led us to a completely sunny Bad Tölz at the Isar river. That way I also increased my knowledge of local geography. With a long time exposure, taken without a filter, only with a large aperture and low ISO, some assembled pebbles on the ground instead of a tripod, I wanted to capture the wave play of river Isar.

    It was only in our hotel on the computer that the resulting structure became more interesting and clear to me. For Christa the image shows picturesque brush strokes of an oil painting. I can think of the surface structure of the sun which is a fiery dance of magnetic field lines and mass distributions of hydrogen.

    Painterly strokes of Isar waves. © Julian Köpke

    In the evening a long sunset glowed for us in Königsdorf. The rotational planes of sun, moon and earth are quite close and in a few days we expect a partial lunar eclipse.

    Waxing crescent Moon and Venus at sunset in Königsdorf with view of the Alps © Julian Köpke

    The light takes 8 minutes from the sun to the earth. Due to atmosphere it remains visible to us longer than the sun itself.

    Sunset with view of the Alps © Julian Köpke
  • Landscape,  Travel

    Moonset in Alling

    It had become very late last night and my tiredness did not let me think clearly. I also didn’t know what happened after I went to bed. It could easily have been the end of a human being.

    With the warm morning sunlight from the left the winter fields of Alling in December were wonderful to look at. With my senses clouded, I thought the moon would rise. It took me a long time to figure out he was going down.

    Moonset - Landscape near Alling © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Monochrome,  X-Ray

    X-ray Xmas floral arrangement

    Today was a day of dense work and many technical problems. The day before I had made some flower arrangements for Christmas from my preferred flower dealer. A technician took me some X-rays so I could study the exposure values when my wirk was finished.

    The following two I liked most.

    X-ray Xmas floral arrangement photo © Julian Köpke

    The vase on the right side seems to hover over the ground.

    X-ray Xmas floral arrangement photo © Julian Köpke
  • Fusion imaging,  X-Ray

    Snail shells X-ray fusion photos

    A friend handed me out some snail shells that he had in mind for a long time to lend me. Eventually, he found 5 beautiful shells when cleaning up the basement.

    The effect of the images depends strongly on the post-processing. Some of the results may not be combined in one presentation.

    Here I show three images of them as dark jewels with an intrinsic undefinable light. Maybe, we are thousand miles below sea level.

    X-ray fusion photo snail shells composition II © Julian Köpke

    Fusion imaging works with a light box. Without, too. It depends on your subject. The light images were taken with a Leica Q, pointing just in the same direction as the X-rays from below of the X-ray tube. The resolution and technology is completely sufficient for the color use.

    I designed a new composition, which should allow me to have different positions of the shells in space. The surrounding snail shells serve as supports.

    X-ray fusion photo snail shells composition III © Julian Köpke

    I wanted to take the yellow, quit radiopaque snail shell from above. So I had to rearrange the snail shells once more.

    When looking at my flickr stream you may find other representations in the preceding neighborhood of this image.

    X-ray fusion photo snail shells composition IV © Julian Köpke
  • Fusion imaging,  X-Ray

    X-ray fusion photo of a sphere of snail shells

    This X-ray fusion image is untrue. No time during working hours to take the photograph. So I made a photo this morning at home. There are so many snail shells glued on the sphere that it is basically not noticeable if the rotation does not match exactly.

    Here is my result:

    X-ray fusion photo of a sphere of snail shells © Julian Köpke

    The underlying structure in an image of visible light looks like this:

    Sphere of snail shells © Julian Köpke
  • Monochrome,  X-Ray

    X-ray photo of a ball from snail shells

    Today’s fun was the X-ray of a sphere of snail shells, which I found as decoration in my sister-in-law’s house. It was immediately clear to me that the spherical structure of the glued snail shells would become a great X-ray image.

    The original X-ray version with a black background is dark and strong. The whole thing looks like a picture of a virus. Nobody would ever think that it was a polystyrene sphere to which snail shells had been glued.

    X-ray photo of a ball from snail shells © Julian Köpke

    In the inverted version, the object comes to the fore much more as an independent unit. A flu virus ? A plant seed ?

    X-ray photo of a ball from snail shells L-channel inverted © Julian Köpke
  • General

    Autumn in the castle garden of Schwetzingen

    Good weather is now over. The days are getting dull. With a light haze in the sky, the sun runs a little deeper than yesterday. It gets dark noticeably earlier.

    Another photographer had the same thought, to spend this day in the castle garden of Schwetzingen. And the same vision to shoot the Japanese white bridge over a pond with nice reflections.

    Japanese bridge castle gardens Schwetzingen © Julian Köpke

    It has become autumn and the reflections in the ponds of the castle garden unfold a greater charm.

    Castle gardens Schwetzingen © Julian Köpke

    The rest of the park is already prepared for the winter and seems inhospitable to the photographic eye.

    Waiting for winter in Schwetzingen castle gardens © Julian Köpke
  • flowers,  Fusion imaging,  Lightbox,  X-Ray

    Calendar 2020

    Harold says: 9 out of ten attempts fail. That’s a good consolation. What happened ?

    A company and I could not agree on the fee for an annual calendar 2020. I liked the selection of the proposed pictures, consisting of flower macros and fusion images with X-ray. „Don’t call us, we call you !“

    I’m not a merchant and I don’t live on sales. But how many have to listen to such sentences every day.

    With a little help from my elder daughter I did the calendar on my own.