I like to make things visible the naked eye isn't able to see. That's part of my profession as a radiologist, too.

  • General,  Travel

    Is this a photography ?

    My conference schedule allowed me a walk through the Berlin Tiergarten Park in the morning. Of course, with a cam handy. While I was sitting on the shore of the Landwehr Canal, I let myself be carried away by the waves.

    The waves made the reflections of the trees and bushes softly tremble. The resulting reflections became like paintings.

    Reflections © Julian Köpke

    The processing was carried out only with regard to brightness and colors. Lab colors were used. Light-dark-contrasts were given by the waves.

  • flowers

    After the rain

    Since days with an unsafe walk afflicted after an impact trauma with the head against a sloping roof in a Black Forest hotel last weekend I walk today after the first rain for weeks through our garden. Everything’s shines in rich colors under raindrops.

    My first image is an attempt to capture two colors.

    Physalis after the rain © Julian Köpke

    Warm and cold colors combined in these heucheria leaves.

    Conflowers like stars within two colors.

    Coneflower or Rudbeckia triloba © Julian Köpke
  • Fusion imaging,  X-Ray

    Spider conch X-ray fusion photo

    A friend gave me a shell of a spider conch to make more fusion images. The scientific name of the spider conch is lambis lambis and it is a sea snail. There is a nice Wikipedia article on it.

    The hard shell with a lot of radiopaque lime made me doubt the success of my X-rays. On top, my first attempt at a HighKey image wasn’t really convincing. Only the combination of a normal photography for the color, a HighKey image for a transparency effect together with the X-ray image resulted in nice image.

    Fusion image spider conch X-ray and photo seen from the bottom © Julian Köpke
    Fusion image spider conch (lambis lambis) X-ray and photo seen from above © Julian Köpke

    The X-ray image appear less lively, but full of formal power. The orientation of the animal is conveyed by the photographically reproduced color. There are only minimal hints wich orientation the X-ray has.

    These are the corresponding X-ray images:

    Spider conch (lambis lambis) © Julian Köpke
    Spider conch (lambis lambis) © Julian Köpke
  • General,  Monochrome

    Thundercloud vortex

    Has the future ever been read from the migration of the clouds ? Their forms and movements have always been exciting and inspiring for me. A vortex of clouds immediately creates a vortex of emotions.

    That is why clouds have long been the subject of my photographic interest and I have created a considerable collection of cloud images. 

    Last night a long heat wave ended with a thunderstorm. Above our house the clouds were swirling, lightning sometimes closer, sometimes further away. Islands of brightness changed rapidly in a threatening sea of black clouds.

    Swirling Thunderclouds © Julian Köpke
    Swirling Thunderclouds. Before the rain starts © Julian Köpke

    In some ways, these clouds remind me of interstellar gas clouds in our galaxy. In the example below the colors of the panorama image of M8 (or „Lagoon Nebula“) are suppressed to better recognize the structure.

    M8 Lagoon Nebula Panorama of 6 tiles © Julian Köpke
  • Architecture,  Travel

    Port cranes in Heilbronn

    Cranes have always fascinated me. When I was a little boy, I could watch her work for hours. When I arrived at the garden exhibition in Heilbronn, I initially only had eyes for the two harbour cranes that were unloading the cargo of sand from a ship.

    The old cranes look historic, but were still in service. I especially liked their green and yellow and the many ropes with which the shovel from the boom reached into the ship to pack the goods.

    Harbour cranes Heilbronn © Julian Köpke
    Harbour cranes Heilbronn © Julian Köpke
  • Background,  flowers,  Monochrome

    Heucheria leaves

    Backgrounds create a new image impression. Sometimes you need a background to add to the picture some more pizzazz. In these pictures I use the background to simulate a photographic base as I saw it in Karl Blossfeldt’s pictures.

    The starting point is always a color image. With a background named „Aged Board“ the color image already shows an attractiveness of its own.

    Heucheria leaf © Julian Köpke

    The Black & White conversion enhances the contrast a bit which is why I’m adding a little glow.

    Heucheria leaf © Julian Köpke

    From another Heucheria leaf, which shone in a wonderful red, I show here only the black and white conversion with background. This makes the reproduction of its structure much better.

    Heucheria leaf © Julian Köpke
  • flowers

    A rose is a rose is a rose

    Just photograph a rose and show its beauty – how wonderful that would be. Is the light right ? Do false shadows emerge ? Is the structure correctly reproduced ?

    Again and again I have to go through our garden and look at the flowers. Yesterday was it again. The sun had just set and the full moon should have decreased a little later.

    I tried it with all f-stops the camera and lens gave to me. To my surprise the aperture 32 at ISO 50 with 45s exposure speed was my favorite. Only at the edge the picture had to be darkened and desaturated. Post-processing can be as simple as that.

    Rose during Golden Hour © Julian Köpke
  • World at night

    Partial lunar eclipse

    Night clouds may be a creative opportunity, although they generally lead to limitations in the visibility of a celestial event. Last evening was such an opportunity. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

    There is enough structure in the image to please one’s eye. The color of the Moon has a rusty tone outside the central shadow of the earth.

    A cloudy evening in Heidelberg with a silent partial lunar eclipse. © Julian Köpke

    The composite of this capture with a mood picture on site is technically not completely satisfactory. I should have made more different exposures of the night sky.

    Heidelberg partial lunar eclipse © Julian Köpke
  • Travel

    End of the world

    On a ball there is no such thing like an end or a beginning. Before the discovery of America the region we traveled to today was called „End of the world“ or „Finistère“ in French. The Atlantic Ocean shows its wild side here.

    On our way from Camaret-sur-Mer to Pointe du Raz we came through many old villages of Brittany. St. Nic is such a place, where you can find a pretty church building.

    Èglise St. Nic © Julian Köpke

    Coming form Douarnenez you first reach Point du Van in westerly direction. The church is consecrated to shipwreckers.

    Église Pointe du Van © Julian Köpke
    Église Pointe du Van © Julian Köpke

    Within sight of the western wall you can perceive a small lighthouse.

    Sailing boat and lighthouse © Julian Köpke

    After a short drive, first in a southerly direction and then in a westerly direction, you reach Pointe du Raz. At low tide the is a strong current in southern direction. The water is visibly swirled between the rocks. At this point, where the world ended 528 years ago, you can easily imagine a wild Ocean.

    Our journey to Brittany now has come to its end.

    See more images in my album.

    Pointe du Raz © Julian Köpke
  • General,  Travel

    Anchor at Camaret-sur-Mer

    Camaret-sur-Mer is a place with a long history, which tells the former economic and military importance. Cabaret has been also the most important lobster port in France. The place is located on a peninsula of strategic importance for the security of Brest. The peninsula was therefore coveted by Great Britain and Spain in their fight against France.

    The Vauban tower bears witness to France’s fight against the conquerors. I took the following image with my tripod in front an old warehouse of the former shipyard.

    La tour Vauban Camaret-sur-Mer © Julian Köpke

    The civil shipwrecks show the decline of fishing in the region. You can’t find warships here.

    Shipwrecks in Camaret-sur-Mer © Julian Köpke
    Èpaves à la port de Camaret-sur-Mer © Julian Köpke
    Épaves à Camaret-sur-Mer © Julian Köpke

    All ships are damaged, by time, by economic ruin. This is where they found their last port.

    Épaves à Camaret-sur-Mer © Julian Köpke

    Where is our final anchor point ? Will it be interesting to look at us ?

    Anchor and Moon à Camaret-sur-Mer © Julian Köpke

    See also my album „Camaret-sur-Mer„.