X-Ray

Gradients and X-ray tubes

Fusion imaging is a method full of surprise. My red calla lilies revealed an effect I had forgotten completely. There must be a gradient in every X-ray exposure.

Preparing a fusion image composition with my 6 red calla lilies I found a troublesome gradient in the X-ray. 

Gradient in an X-ray of 6 red calla lilies © Julian Köpke

The cause for the gradient is a weakening of X-ray radiation at its origin in the X-ray tube. A closer look at the phenomenon can be found in my FAQ. This effect of variable recording of photons phycisists call „anode heel effect“.

As part of my creative process I rotated the composition shown above by 180 degrees and exposed it a second time with the same parameters. Note that post-production as well was done equally for both X-ray exposures !

Gradient in an X-ray of 6 red calla lilies, inverted for creative reasons © Julian Köpke

I like to make things visible the naked eye isn't able to see. That's part of my profession as a radiologist, too.

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